Thursday, September 27, 2012

CAPACITY BUILDING AND QUARTERLY MEETING OF THE PARTNERSHIP FOR NUTRITION IN TANZANIA (PANITA) ON 27TH TO 28TH SEPTEMBER 2012.

PANITA is a civil society led forum, aiming at mobilizing non-state organizations to influence effective policy changes in Tanzania, both at national and district levels; to act as a catalyst for enabling/mobilizing a wide range of stakeholders to work together to implement a coherent and comprehensive strategy for nutrition; foster dialogue, communication and nutrition information sharing among partners and increase partners’ advocacy capacity and impact. 


The problem of malnutrition in Tanzania
The 2010 Tanzania Demographic and Health Survey (TDHS) indicates that  infant and under five child  mortality rates,  though showing a declining trend between 1996 and 2010, are still high at 51 and 81 per 1000 live births, respectively. This situation implies that 5 out of every 100 children die before their first birthday and 8 out of 100 children die before their fifth birthday. The 2010 TDHS further indicates that the mortality rates were similarly high in both rural and urban settings.


 PANITA members on the meeting concentrating on the Seminar.

 PANITA members on the meeting concentrating on the Seminar.
 PANITA members deep to discuss more more about food and Nutrition in Tanzania because

The 2010 TDHS also indicates that chronic malnutrition is endemic with 42%[1] of children aged less than five years in Tanzania stunted, making it one of the 10 worst affected countries in the world.


 Members are waiting for the other section of Food and Nutrition at Victori Parace Hotel..
 PANITA Members on the meeting.

 Member is presenting what they have discussed in their group.

 Members are discusing on their group

 Members are discussing more about food and Nutrition in Lake zone.

 Members are more concentration by listening presentation on the meeting. 


MORE ABOUT FOOD AND NUTRITION IN TANZANIA.
Eight out of ten infants and six out of ten under fives are anaemic. Although anaemia rates among the young children seem to have dropped by 18 % compared to 5 years before the 2010 TDHS (72% in 2004/2005 and 59% in 2009/10), the current rates are still unacceptably high. Similarly, over 40 % of children do not have access to adequately iodized salt, increasing the risks that they will suffer intellectual impairment (TDHS, 2010).
The nutritional status of women is also alarming. About 40 percent of women of child bearing age are anaemic, and more than one in ten are thin (with body mass index (BMI) of  less than 18.5) (TDHS, 2010).The TDHS 2010 report indicates that  more than 50 % of pregnant women are anaemic and only about 4 % of women took the recommended at least 90 doses of iron and folic acid tablets during their most recent pregnancy. Similarly only 26 % of women took the recommended postpartum vitamin A dose to help in enhancing the immunity of both the mother and a breastfeeding child. Inequities in nutritional status continue to persist, with most malnourished children and women living in rural areas.

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